книга Elizabeth Scott - Young-adult fiction

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Elizabeth Scott - Young-adult fiction

скачать Elizabeth Scott - Young-adult fiction бесплатно Название: Elizabeth Scott - Young-adult fiction
Автор: Elizabeth Scott
Страниц: 6х193
Формат: PDF
Размер: 48
Качество: Отличное
Язык: Английский
Год издания: 2007-2009

Lauren's life seems almost perfect at first. She's got a perfect boyfriend, Dave. She's not struggling with school.

 She's got an awesome best friend, Katie. She doesn't really fight with her father. Her life is good. Safe, but good. She's not happy, though. Lauren doesn't know why, but her life doesn't seem like all it's cracked up to be. Neither does her relationship with Dave, who may be just a little bit too perfect. She finds a chance to make herself happy when Evan Kirkland comes to town, but is she ready to let go and take the plunge? Is Lauren ready to leave her safe, boring life behind for the passion and happiness that she sees with Evan? She's not sure.

She has, after all, struggled not to be like her mother, who let herself run away to pursue what she wanted even though it meant leaving her husband and young daughter behind. But does being who she, Lauren, wants to be have to mean sacrificing her happiness just to make the choice everyone else seems to think is right? BLOOM is a beautiful, powerful love story, a wonderful coming-of-age story, and most of all just an amazing novel told in Lauren's fresh, funny, and distinctive voice. Lauren is a strong, likeable character, and she is not the only three-dimensional character in the story--they are all fantastic. Fantastic is also a good word to describe BLOOM itself. Elizabeth Scott is a wonderful writer, and this brilliant novel makes me very excited to see what this author will write next!

Bloom
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 1416926836 | 183 pages | 2007 | PDF

Lauren's life seems almost perfect at first. She's got a perfect boyfriend, Dave. She's not struggling with school. She's got an awesome best friend, Katie. She doesn't really fight with her father. Her life is good. Safe, but good. She's not happy, though. Lauren doesn't know why, but her life doesn't seem like all it's cracked up to be. Neither does her relationship with Dave, who may be just a little bit too perfect. She finds a chance to make herself happy when Evan Kirkland comes to town, but is she ready to let go and take the plunge? Is Lauren ready to leave her safe, boring life behind for the passion and happiness that she sees with Evan? She's not sure. She has, after all, struggled not to be like her mother, who let herself run away to pursue what she wanted even though it meant leaving her husband and young daughter behind. But does being who she, Lauren, wants to be have to mean sacrificing her happiness just to make the choice everyone else seems to think is right? BLOOM is a beautiful, powerful love story, a wonderful coming-of-age story, and most of all just an amazing novel told in Lauren's fresh, funny, and distinctive voice. Lauren is a strong, likeable character, and she is not the only three-dimensional character in the story--they are all fantastic. Fantastic is also a good word to describe BLOOM itself. Elizabeth Scott is a wonderful writer, and this brilliant novel makes me very excited to see what this author will write next!

Perfect You
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 1416953558 | 203 pages | 2008 | PDF

Kate's life has never been perfect, but it used to be fairly okay: She grew up with a best friend, Anna, who knew everything about her, and vice-versa. She had a roof over her head, two parents with stable jobs, and no big conflicts with her older brother. She got decent grades in school and had a decent freshman year. But now she's a sophomore, and Kate's life is so far from perfect that it's in another state. When Anna came back from her summer vacation, she looked like a different person. Newly thin and blonde, Anna starts hanging out with the popular crowd at school and stops speaking to Kate. Kate's father abruptly quit his job to sell Perfect You infomercial vitamins in a booth at the local mall. Kate is expected to work there after school, and she doesn't get paid for it. In fact, sometimes, she's the only person manning the booth, as her father is prone to wander off to play video games or solicit customers from other stores. Due to her less-than-stellar driving tests, Kate isn't allowed to get a car yet, so she has to rely on her family members to cart her around. Her brother obtained a college degree, then moved back home. Instead of actually getting a job, he sits on the couch and decides he wants to be an actor. Of course, he changes his dream job as often as he changes his socks, so Kate doubts he's serious. To top it all off, a guy at school named Will with a reputation for flirting and leading girls on keeps bugging her. Kate is conflicted, to say the least. Her first-person narration relates her ups-and-downs with Will, Anna, and her family members. She doesn't want to admit that she likes Will and she certainly doesn't want to get hurt, but she starts to see him anyway. She restricts their time together to mall breaks, not wanting people at school to know about them, and she refuses to let things become serious. She doesn't even know if Will honestly likes her or is just using her like he's used all of the other girls, and she pretends as though she doesn't care either way. She desperately wants to repair her friendship with Anna but isn't sure what it will take to do that. Kate is mortified by her father's antics at the mall, but she suffers these little indignities quietly, not wanting to stir up trouble. She can sense that her parents' relationship, once fun-loving, is starting to get strained. Kate's maternal grandmother comes to visit and ends up staying indefinitely. After taking a second job to make ends meet, Kate's mother is stressed enough, and the addition of her own mother to the household only causes more problems. Sometimes, all it takes is a good or bad conversation, even one that's ten seconds long, to change your mind and your feelings. Elizabeth Scott (Bloom) writes dialogue that sounds very true to life and very true to teens - remarkably, with minimal swearing and slang. A quick exchange of words with Anna and Kate thinks they are friends again, then a blatant snub in the hallway makes her heart sink. It's hard to have a friend "outgrow" you or otherwise leave you behind. I like that they drifted apart due to their own changes (well, Anna wanting something more and changing herself) rather than being torn apart by some devastating, earth-shattering event. Nevertheless, it still felt devastating to Kate. By the end of the book, things in Kate's home have changed yet again, and her relationships with Anna and Will are totally different than they were at the beginning of the school year. Kate has to decide whether to hang on or move on.

Stealing H eaven
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 0061122807 | 193 pages | 2008 | PDF

"My name is Danielle. I'm eighteen. I've been stealing things as long as I can remember." The three short sentences on the inside of the cover flap draw you into the story like an old friend to an adventure. Danielle's life hasn't ever been normal. She and her mother have moved from town to town for as long as she can remember. But what they do in these towns is what matters. They steal silver, their drug of choice, from mansions and rich houses. Her father did it, before he was caught, her mother does it, and it's what she knows how to do. The question is "Is it what she wants to do?" Dani doesn't think that the sleepy coastal town of Heaven will be any different from any other place they've hit, but in fact it changes her entire life. She feels at home in the small beach town. Allison Donaldson, a nice, talkative girl, tempts Dani with friendship. Then Dani meets Greg, a cute boy that shows up everywhere, who makes her heart flutter and who, inadvertently, gets her to reveal her real name. As Dani starts to question her job as a thief, she finds out that the next house they've targeted is the Donaldson's--Allison's house--and that Greg is a cop, who she can never have a relationship with. "Stealing Heaven" is a captivating coming-of-age novel that everyone who reads it will love. Elizabeth Scott's writing is natural and funny, I seriously want to get my hands on "Perfect You," and any of her other books. She really lets you get into the mind of her main character. Dani's situation is unique and impossible to relate to but you end up doing that anyway. If you want a quick, funny and captivating read, "Stealing Heaven" by Elizabeth Scott is highly recommended.

Living Dead Girl
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 1416960597 | 193 pages | 2007 | PDF

Those are the three words that come to mind when I think of Elizabeth Scott's Living Dead Girl. After finishing it in one sitting late last night, I'm still trying to catch my breath and desperately trying to get rid of the weight that seems to have settled on my chest. But I think it will be a long time before this happens because what has happened to "Alice" in the book can happen to a child in real life...probably has happened. The book is told from the point of view of "Alice" a fifteen-year old girl who was kidnapped on an elementary school field trip when she was 10. Her captor, Ray, has sexually and physically abused her every day since he kidnapped her. He starves her because he doesn't want her to physically mature, he terrorizes her and tells her that he'll kill her parents and burn their house down if she tries to escape. I'm putting "Alice" in parentheses because that is not her real name. It's the name Ray gave her, the same name he gave the girl he kidnapped and killed before he kidnapped the second Alice. Alice calls herself a "living dead girl." She's numb inside, she's hungry, she's been tortured so much that she wishes for death. She's waiting for it, hoping for it, expecting it any day; but Ray has something different in mind that is even more terrifying to the reader, and he needs Alice's help. I've always heard stories about people getting kidnapped and having many opportunities to escape, but they don't. This is Alice's case. There are multiple opportunities for her to tell someone, to run away, to ask for help, but Ray has instilled so much fear in her that she doesn't even think about it anymore. She truly believes that he will kill her parents, and at one point she says, "I could run, but he would find me. He would take me back to 623 Daisy Lane and make everyone who lives there pay. He would make everyone there pay even if he didn't find me. I belong to him. I'm his little girl. All I have to do is be good" (p. 34). What is most profound is that Ray has brainwashed her to the point of her believing that she's bad, she's selfish, and that it's all her fault. On the day of the kidnapping, she wouldn't share her lip gloss with her friends. They walked away from her, leaving her alone and exposed to a monster, but she blames herself, thinks if she wouldn't have been so selfish, her life would be different. It's truly heartbreaking. But the worst part is that people look the other way. They know something's not right, but don't step in. Scott's writing is gripping, captivating, and horrifying. She draws you in from the very beginning, and Alice immediately becomes real, someone you ache for, someone who you want to make it, someone you want to pluck out of this nightmare of a life. If you're wondering about the language and descriptions in the book, it is evident that Ray is sexually abusing Alice. It's evident that sexual acts are being performed, but the language itself is not graphic. When discussing why she wrote Living Dead Girl, Elizabeth Scott says, " I wrote Living Dead Girl because it demanded to be told, and I hope it speaks to you as strongly as it did to me." (read more at Simon & Schuster's website). Did I like the story? Honestly, no. I don't like stories about children being sexually abused. Was it well-written? Absolutely. Should every parent read it? Absolutely. Should teens read it? I want to say yes. I want to say that it could potentially save lives, but it's scary. All I want to do is scoop my daughter up and never let her go.

Something, Maybe
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 1416978658 | 193 pages | 2007 | PDF

Previous to this I had only read Bloom by Elizabeth Scott. I thought that one was ok where as this was fantastic! Right off the bat the book was funny and engaging, it felt like my best friend wrote it, someone with my same sense of humor. I found myself giggling and laughing and possibly even snorting once or twice when reading this book. It was a lot of fun but also had a more serious and emotional side. The humor was found in all sorts of places from the fact that Hannah works at a call center for BurgerTown (what?!?!?!) with two boys from her high school, one who she has a massive crush on and the other one that annoys the heck out of her. And that basically she has someone not unlike Hugh Hefner for a father. Just a great set-up for a book. While her family situation is humorous (old playboy dad with lots of girlfriends and a mother that used to be one of them and now has her own internet show) it's also the source for the more serious emotional stuff in the book. Hannah hasn't seen her father in about 5 years and gets made fun of at school because of her family. There is a lot of stuff going on here. My favorite part, of course, was the love triangle that forms between Hannah and her co-workers Josh and Finn. Pretty much everyone but Hannah knows which one she should go for. It almost gets to the point where she seems kind of dense but finally comes to her senses! I thought this was a funny, engaging and sweet book and it's just proven to me more why I should read the rest of Elizabeth Scott's books!

Love You Hate You Miss You
Publisher: Simon Pulse | ISBN: 0061122831 | 193 pages | 2009 | PDF

These are my least favorite kinds of reviews to write because I honestly have nothing particularly exciting or intelligent to say about this book. Love You Hate You Miss You was good. It was believable. I was sympathetic towards Amy and continuously hoped for her to feel like she deserved to have her own life in the aftermath of Julia's death. Elizabeth Scott wrote the novel very well, in a way that teens will really understand and relate to. But that's about all I got. The book was good, it wasn't great. I liked it, I did not love it. I will probably not remember much about this novel a few months from now. I think my issue with this one is that I assumed that it would be a very emotional read - it sure sounds like it would be, right? But I personally just didn't connect with the story like I wanted to. I empathized with Amy and I rooted for her, definitely, but I just didn't FEEL it. So that leads me to conclude that it's something to do with me specifically, a connection that I personally missed with the novel. Which leads me to believe that you, dear reader, may have a totally different experience with this book. So my conclusion is that Love You Hate You Miss You is a good book by an excellent author that I personally did not connect with in the way in which I was expecting to. So I'm recommending the book to YA fans with the caveat that I still need to figure out what about the book did not work for me...

  [dfiles] [turbobit] [letitbit]






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